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lostsplendor:

Soviet Union Metro, Russia c. 1953 (via Retronaut)

I really want to know what is going on in the upper corner

lostsplendor:

Soviet Union Metro, Russia c. 1953 (via Retronaut)

I really want to know what is going on in the upper corner

lostsplendor:

To Live Like a Tsar, The Estate of Tsar Aleksey Mikhailovish Romanov (via English Russia)

lostsplendor:

Thoughtful Tsaritsa.  Source: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

lostsplendor:

Thoughtful Tsaritsa.  Source: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

ornamentedbeing:

Like I said, the Paris-Moscow collection was amazing due to the fact that everything had a meaning. The attention to detail was superb! 

ornamentedbeing:

The first thing that had me irritated with my classmates was some of the girls pointed out how ah-mazing it was that Chanel could create such interesting headdresses that no one has ever seen before.

Meanwhile I was at the table pulling my impersonation of Lord Elrond’s eyebrow ( ) thinking seriously you guys??

I hated breaking it to my classmates (not really I thought it was totally amusing) but the Kokoshnik has been around since the 16th century and correct me if I am mistaken but Chanel came about only in 1909/1910. 

The married women of 16th and 17th century Moscow were required to cover their head compulsory. The used specific hats usually adorned with embroideries, gold, pearls etc. Later on as the fashion evolved and became more sophisticated, the Russian headdresses became more sumptuous and were used at different ceremonials, fancy-dress balls or even as everyday outfit showing the aristocratic rank of the wearer. These further evolved in the case of those made for the high aristocracy in Kokoshnik shape tiaras. ” -RoyalRomania

(extant pieces live at the Met)

ornamentedbeing:

So my fellow comrades, one of my favorite parts of the collection was the attention to detail. How precious are these matryoshka purses? And the necklace and earrings. So clever!

ornamentedbeing:

I’m sure everyone is tired of me posting this but I love the embroidery so much I couldn’t resist!

Court Robe 1900

The embroidery of these gowns was extraordinary. Sometimes featuring floral motifs, or rocailles inspired by the architecture of the capital, the art of the embroidery was at a very high level. These court dresses were frequently shown at international textile exhibitions as a showcase for Russian talents in the field. The right to produce Court Gowns was strictly controlled, and in the 20th century was limited to:

Olga Nikolaevna Bulbenkova (c. 1835-1918)
Founded a fashion house in St. Petersburg in the mid-nineteenth century, which survived until 1917, and was known as Madame Olga’s. The house was popular for its court gowns, the Paradnaya Plat’e. Gold and Silver embroidery was executed for Mme. Olga by the workshops of I.L. Vasiliev at the Yekaterinsky Canal. Dresses ordered for the imperial family were embroidered at the Novotikhvinsky Convent workshop that specialized in this gold threadwork. In the early 20th century, Olga’s niece took over the practical management of the house.

Izembard Chanceau
Proprietor of a Petersburg fashion house which also made formal court gowns in the late nineteenth and early 20th centuries. The work of Izembard Chanceau is recognized by its use of paillettes, or sequins, rather than the ornate gold thread embroidery which was Madame Olga’s hallmark.

A.T. Ivanova
St. Petersburg dressmaker who also had license to produce court gowns for private clients in the early 20th century. She largely produced gowns for private clients. Ivanova was a popular dressmaker, and her firm survived the revolution. Ivanova and her chief rival Lamanova, both became costume designers for film and theater in the Soviet era.

The Soviet period saw the end of not only the wearing of court attire, but the virtual extinction of the Russian art of ecclesiastical embroidery. Many of the women who were capable of this type of embroidery fled the revolution, and moved to France, where they were eagerly employed by couturiers such as Patou, Lanvin, and Chanel.

Convents are beginning to revive the art of embroidery in Russia, but the days of the paradnaya plat’e are over.”