Victorian Tumblr Themes
Shiny!
fripperiesandfobs:

Evening dress ca. 1910
From Doyle New York

fripperiesandfobs:

Evening dress ca. 1910

From Doyle New York

fripperiesandfobs:

Evening dress ca. 1905

From Whitaker Auctions

loveandasandwich:

Who wants to play videogames with BMO?Now up for grabs.

loveandasandwich:

Who wants to play videogames with BMO?
Now up for grabs.

fripperiesandfobs:

Dior ball dress. 1951

From the Chicago History Museum

fripperiesandfobs:

Ensemble, 1900

From the Chicago History Museum

Now THAT is a pop of color.

fripperiesandfobs:

Doucet evening dress ca. 1908
From Beverley Birks

fripperiesandfobs:

Doucet evening dress ca. 1908

From Beverley Birks

fripperiesandfobs:

Costume designed by Adrian for Gladys George in Marie Antoinette (1938).
From The Museum at FIT

fripperiesandfobs:

Costume designed by Adrian for Gladys George in Marie Antoinette (1938).

From The Museum at FIT

ornamentedbeing:

Il était une fois … . 
   Once upon a time … . 

ornamentedbeing:

Il était une fois … . 

   Once upon a time … . 

ornamentedbeing:

I am officially declaring today to be top secret Tuesday so I will share a secret: I am a Stars Wars nerd and I am not afraid to admit it even if Natalie Portman is a terrible actress.

I wonder how many beautiful creations were destroyed for the costumers to get that many wax flowers? 

The Wedding dress was mostly made from an antique lace bedspread from the late Edwardian period. Because there wasn’t enough material to make the preconceived design, they altered the pattern to make it fit. The veil was made of Maltese lace and the headdress was decorated with Edwardian wax flowers with beaded pearls. To further decorate the dress, the costume designers made over three hundred yards of French-knit braid for the Cornely scrollwork found throughout the dress. It was then studded with pearls. Interestingly, when shooting the wedding scene in Italy, production supervisor Guido Cerasuolo exclaimed “Ah, Italian lace!” upon seeing the outfit.”

The murder of antique clothing always makes me sad.

ornamentedbeing:

Lacemaker’s Prayer “Lord, let me grow old like beautiful lace, cherished and treasured and cared for with grace.” Author Unknown

For some reason this made me cry. It’s disconcerting to feel tears roll down ones face without ever knowing they were there in the first place. Maybe it’s because that is how I want to age, cherished and treasured and cared for with grace.

ornamentedbeing:

I’m sure everyone is tired of me posting this but I love the embroidery so much I couldn’t resist!

Court Robe 1900

The embroidery of these gowns was extraordinary. Sometimes featuring floral motifs, or rocailles inspired by the architecture of the capital, the art of the embroidery was at a very high level. These court dresses were frequently shown at international textile exhibitions as a showcase for Russian talents in the field. The right to produce Court Gowns was strictly controlled, and in the 20th century was limited to:

Olga Nikolaevna Bulbenkova (c. 1835-1918)
Founded a fashion house in St. Petersburg in the mid-nineteenth century, which survived until 1917, and was known as Madame Olga’s. The house was popular for its court gowns, the Paradnaya Plat’e. Gold and Silver embroidery was executed for Mme. Olga by the workshops of I.L. Vasiliev at the Yekaterinsky Canal. Dresses ordered for the imperial family were embroidered at the Novotikhvinsky Convent workshop that specialized in this gold threadwork. In the early 20th century, Olga’s niece took over the practical management of the house.

Izembard Chanceau
Proprietor of a Petersburg fashion house which also made formal court gowns in the late nineteenth and early 20th centuries. The work of Izembard Chanceau is recognized by its use of paillettes, or sequins, rather than the ornate gold thread embroidery which was Madame Olga’s hallmark.

A.T. Ivanova
St. Petersburg dressmaker who also had license to produce court gowns for private clients in the early 20th century. She largely produced gowns for private clients. Ivanova was a popular dressmaker, and her firm survived the revolution. Ivanova and her chief rival Lamanova, both became costume designers for film and theater in the Soviet era.

The Soviet period saw the end of not only the wearing of court attire, but the virtual extinction of the Russian art of ecclesiastical embroidery. Many of the women who were capable of this type of embroidery fled the revolution, and moved to France, where they were eagerly employed by couturiers such as Patou, Lanvin, and Chanel.

Convents are beginning to revive the art of embroidery in Russia, but the days of the paradnaya plat’e are over.” 

ornamentedbeing:

Woman’s robe a la française, England, circa 1765. Silk plain weave (faille) with silk and metallic-thread supplementary-weft patterning (lamella or strip, fillé, and frisé), trimmed with metallic lace.

c.1765

ornamentedbeing:

The Melville Bed

ca. 1700

The bedstead consists of an oak bedstock (frame) with four oak posts secured to the rails with bolts. It retains its original ropes and linen ticking fabric to support the mattresses. The top of the posts hold iron spikes that secure the tester (upper horizontal section) and cornice. The coved interior of the tester is built up with facetted boards. The Chinese silk lining bears a Chinese inscription on the selvedge (finished edge of the fabric). Traces of pencil on the underside of the tester cloth provide guidelines for the application of braid and fringe. The curtains are made of joined widths of velvet.”

This is the bed I am going to have if I ever become a high-price whore.